• 18 Cheviot Hill, Porters Lake, NS B3E 1K1

Technical Presentation: Investigating an Occurrence on a Vessel

C.I.MAR.E.  ATLATNIC BRANCH INVITES YOU TO JOIN THEM FOR AN INFORMATIVE WEBINAR

DATE: THURSDAY, November 18th, 2021

TIME: 12:15 Atlantic (8:15 Pacific, 11:15 Eastern, 12:45 NFLD)

Investigating an Occurrence on a Vessel

Summary:

At some time in our sea going or shore side careers we are going to encounter a situation where damage is sustained to a Vessel, its equipment or it’s crew.  How do we document and report the findings of the Investigation so that lessons can be learned.

Abstract:

The primary reason for an investigation is to identify the causes(s) of an occurrence so as to initiate action(s) to prevent similar occurrences.

This is achieved by determining what happened, how and why it happened so that modifications can be made to procedures or equipment that will improve the safety of the Vessel operations.

Accurate and thorough reporting of all occurrences is required to enable lessons to be learnt which may prevent future occurrences.

How to document the occurrence, how to interview witnesses, how to prepare a report are all things that we shall look at in this presentation.

Speaker:                 

John Attersley ,

John Attersley is a member of the Atlantic Branch of the Institute.  John is a graduate of the Canadian Coast Guard College and began his seagoing carreer with the Canadian Coast Guard serving on both West and the East Coast as an Engineering Officer from Junior to Chief Engineer.  He moved to The Transportation Safety Board of Canada as a Marine Casualty Investigator and then to Hayes Stuart Atlantic as a Surveyor before forming his own Survey Company.  Survey work, project work, Underwriters work, consulting and acting as Owners representative have seen him work world wide on many and varied projects.

Read More

Technical Presentation: Coping with CoP26: Climate change and the global shipping industry in 2021

C.I.MAR.E.  ATLATNIC BRANCH INVITES YOU TO JOIN THEM FOR AN INFORMATIVE WEBINAR

DATE: THURSDAY, October 14th, 2021

TIME: 12:15 Atlantic (8:15 Pacific, 11:15 Eastern, 12:45 NFLD)

Coping with CoP26: Climate change and the global shipping industry in 2021

Summary:

Jeffrey Smith presents a survey of climate change developments in the global and Canadian shipping industries, in the context of the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties next month.

Abstract:

The need to reckon with and reduce greenhouse gas emissions has been apparent to the shipping industry for almost 30 years, even as the overall size of the global trade fleet has steadily increased. The presentation first addresses the nature and trend in emissions. The successes of air pollution control of nitrogen and sulphur compounds are recalled. The treaty arrangements created by states in the International Maritime Organization are considered. Current regulatory measures and the notable commitment of IMO states in 2018 to extensive reductions are explored. The presentation concludes with an evaluation of requirements to come after CoP 26 and the trend of individual states to move to economic and direct regulation of emissions.

Speaker:                 

Dr. Jeffrey Smith,

Dr. Jeffrey Smith, FCIMarE, is a member of the Atlantic Branch of the Institute.  A former RCN chief engineer, he researches climate change in the shipping industry including the development of economic and regulatory measures to address greenhouse gas emissions.  Jeffrey advises governments and classification societies in matters as diverse as environmental protection in the Arctic, shipbuilding programs, transportation safety and the law of the sea.  On the faculty of The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs in Ottawa, he is also international law counsel to a government in Africa.

Read More

Technical Presentation – FUTURE TECHNOLOGY and PRESERVING LIFE at SEA

C.I.MAR.E.    ATLANTIC BRANCH INVITES YOU TO JOIN THEM FOR AN INFORMATIVE WEBINAR

DATE: THURSDAY, MARCH 11th

TIME: 18:00 AST (17:00 EASTERN, 14:00 PACIFC, 18:30 NFLD)

FUTURE TECHNOLOGY and PRESERVING LIFE at SEA

A presentation by the Future Technology Panel of the International Maritime Rescue Federation

For thousands of years humankind has had a beneficial relationship with the world’s oceans, lakes, and rivers, for food, transport, and leisure. However, this relationship has not been without cost, the risk of injury and death has always been present, over 300,000 people drown annually.

For the past two centuries rescue organizations have responded to those in distress on the water. Over one hundred of these maritime rescue organizations from 54 countries worldwide are members of the International Maritime Rescue Federation (IMRF), an NGO at IMO. The IMRF facilitates the sharing of experience, expertise, and knowledge among its member organizations in order to save lives, and to protect rescue personnel worldwide.

The Future Technology Panel (FTP) of the IMRF is a group of member organizations which meet to share information and assist each other with the evaluation and implementation of new technologies. The projects cover many areas, large and small, such as the application of Remotely Piloted Air and Marine Systems, autonomous systems, electronic alerting and locating technologies, small craft navigation, crew safety and health.

This presentation outlines many of these technologies, the processes to identify and evaluate these technologies, the possible benefits, and pitfalls, the impact on the public safety, and the impact on the safety of rescue personnel. The FTP members evaluate technologies which have near term application, and those which look further into the future.

This presentation will be of interest to anyone who is concerned with Maritime Safety. Contributors: Search & Rescue Organizations & related firms in Australia, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, & the United Kingdom.

Presenter

John W. Dalziel, M.Sc., P.Eng., IMRF Supporter.

Adjunct Professor, Industrial Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax.

John Dalziel is a naval architect involved in the marine industry for the past half century.  In 1969 he sailed through the North West Passage on the Canadian icebreaker John A Macdonald, along with the American tanker Manhattan.  He has worked with the Canadian Government and industry, primarily in ship construction & repair supervision and safety inspection.   He has been involved with maritime rescue organizations for many years.  As a university student in 1971 he worked for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution in Britain in their technical office..  For the five years he has been involved with the Future Technology Panel of the International Maritime Rescue Federation.   He has spoken internationally on maritime safety and on the application of modern technologies to maritime rescue.

 

Read More